Tag Archives: Young Adult Fiction

This Is One Crazy Free Book Offer

Some of our readers have taken advantage of the free first book in my The Great Thirst serial archaeological mystery. It has a nice collection of reviews. However, I am working on a promotion for The Great Thirst Boxed Set, the complete seven-part series, and it has not been so blessed with reviews. In hopes of making it more likely to be approved by promo sites, I would like to make a crazy offer. Anyone who would like a free copy of this ebook set, please just post a comment with your email and I will get you a copy in mobi or ePub. Please help me get my books in front of more readers, and I will be so grateful! Here’s the Amazon link so you can check it out! http://myBook.to/Great_Thirst_Boxed_Set

In case you are shy about posting your email, here’s mine. Mjmcfindley@gmail.com. Please let me know if you prefer ePub or mobi (Kindle) format.

Thank you so much!

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Filed under Excerpts from our Fiction Books, Reviewing, Writing

A Terrifying Alternative to Science

Nightmare at Emerald High: A Christian Thriller

Malcolm Drake has so much to bear as a sixteen year old high school student. His mother left for another man, taking all their savings. His father has worked long hours playing financial catch-up and been too weary to see his son grow up. Bullies force him to find a hiding place deep in the school’s basement to eat and study. Still, he’s managed to stay out of trouble and keep his grades high.

Malcolm has deeper issues in his past, however, that won’t leave him alone. Haunting dreams of relentless chases through the darkness leave him exhausted in the mornings. A visiting minister called out a prophecy about Malcolm when Malcolm didn’t even know God. Besides, he fled the church because his mother became involved with a deacon and choir director. Malcolm’s father also abandoned the scene of his heartbreak and humiliation. Church keeps pulling Malcolm back, though, and people are praying for him and his father even after ten years’ absence.

A chance for a scholarship pulls Malcolm into an elite science class. He feels strangely drawn to tell the youth pastor about this opportunity since his father is seldom home. Transcendental Meditation is one of the lighter items on the strange “science class” menu. Is it just ancient wisdom applied to solve today’s problems? Or did a chance scene of violent intimidation witnessed from Malcolm’s hiding place give him a hint about the real agenda of the scholarship committee?

This story gives one teenager a lot to deal with. But Malcolm’s not alone as he comes to grips with deciding what he has to do about all the pressure and danger in his life. He has a protection he doesn’t even know about. Because even when you think you’ve left God behind, you might just find that God’s people, and God Himself, still have your back.


Filed under Uncategorized, Writing, Reviewing, Publishing, and about Blogging

Worlds to Save With Five Minute Armies

The Center Circle (The Center Circle Chronicles)

At first I was kind of put off by the idea of a college student pulled into an alternate world and larger than life adventure. What new thing could Steve Biddison bring to a genre that I think started with Alice in Wonderland? But there’s at least potential here for a great allegory.

Biddison’s got plenty of homage to the great SciFi and Fantasy books and shows geeks love. He’s also got a group of young people prepared to save not just one world, but multiple worlds, while keeping ours safe too. I had to consult my History expert husband about this solid silver sword business, even though it is a fantasy. He says a number of famous fighters in history had swords of solid silver, and although they were ceremonial, you really can fight with one.

I loved so many of the details in this story. Lost in a cave? Maybe you’ve just found out a foreshadowing secret you’ll need later. Your soldiers only “exist” for five minutes per wave? Plan your battles very carefully. The Feelings of Faith were a little disturbing. I would rather have had a Holy Text they could rely on. Feelings can deceive us, and Biddison even brought up the ability of their enemy to deceive. Hope he develops this idea more in the series.

The book also deals with issues teens can really relate to. Why does the nasty one get to be the leader? Why is the outcast still outcast after all these years? Why don’t I fit in? Who do I trust? What am I here for?

I have now read quite a few Indie Authors and I am hopeful about the ideas and the talent out there. I am also hopeful honest and trustworthy editors and proofreaders will step up and work something out with these struggling new voices. This books does need that kind of help, but not at all to the point where it’s unreadable.

Image of Steve Biddison



Filed under Uncategorized, Writing, Reviewing, Publishing, and about Blogging

Review of the Huguenot Sword by Shawn Lamb

I am interested in church history, especially regarding Protestants, and as soon as I saw this book I wanted to read it. I got the Amazon Kindle version on a 99 cent Cyber Monday sale after a heads-up from the author on Goodreads. It deals mostly with young adult characters and includes a number of well-known historical figures. For those who don’t know, Huguenots were Protestants who tried to obtain the right to live as citizens and practice their faith in Catholic France but were severely persecuted, especially under Cardinal Richelieu.

Shawn Lamb has created a great study of how ordinary people look at and practice their beliefs, and how those beliefs affect their own lives and conduct, and their interactions with others. If you like the Three Musketeers, the Scarlet Pimpernell, and Zorro, you will like this story. Adventure, disguises, intrigues, court life, expectations of family, arranged marriage, and elements of romance and temptation all enter into the plot and storyline.

Three young men try to live by their motto, “For Friendship, for Faith, and for Freedom,” while aiding the Huguenot Resistance in France. Shawn Lamb provides plenty of swordfighting, pursuits and escapes, and, most importantly, insight into how young people view faith as they mature and make decisions about what they really believe and how it will shape their conduct.

Though I enjoyed the story and characters very much, I found the book contained some technical imperfections. The author was kind enough to share her process of writing and “vetting” a book and her many years of experience with different ways of bringing a book to print. She graciously promised to take my comments about the book into consideration in her future writing.

So, take it all together, the Huguenot Sword was an exciting, satisfying read, a tribute to faith and its struggles to grow, and an opportunity for me to learn firsthand something about how an author gets a book out of her head and into print, or into my Kindle, in this case.  I gave it four out of five stars on Goodreads and Amazon.


Filed under Writing, Reviewing, Publishing, and about Blogging