Tag Archives: Christian

Christian Indie Authors Network Writers’ Conference — Shared from Jen Gentry

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I am very excited to talk about the upcoming Christian Indie Authors Conference 2015, July 30 to August 2, 2015 in Davenport, Iowa at the Radisson River Front Inn. This conference is all about the self-published author and it is a groundbreaking event. There are many helpful sessions to choose from ranging from self-publishing 101, taught by keynote speaker bestselling author Darlene Shortridge, owner of 40 Day Publishing, to many selections on formatting, designing book covers, plus the hottest new marketing trends. Also, there are some special guest speakers teaching on how to improve your writing skills and what to look for when editing. The awards banquet promises to be a gala event where the winners of the CIAN Book of the Year awards will be presented. If you are a savvy self-published author or just starting to learn about how to be a self-publishing author I encourage you to check out this upcoming conference. To find out more about the #CIAN2015 Conference go to http://www.christianindieauthors.com/cia-conference.html

Visit Jen Gentry’s Books here:

http://jengentrysbooks.weebly.com/

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Best Christian Book Covers of 2014

2015 covers

These are not my Best of 2014 cover choices. They are just the covers for my 2015 Writing Goals

Recently several author groups shared around a post called “Worst Christian Book Covers of 2014”. I’m not going to link to it, because, frankly, I don’t want to give it one single more view. Many sites are set up to include a “worst of” whatever so that people can make clever but snarky and often cruel comments and feel superior. Instead, please share your “Best of” covers. If you can’t come up with just one, that’s okay too.

But I’d like to set some ground rules so we are not just posting one for our best friend or to promo our cover designer, or other criteria than what really IS the best. I also want to encourage people to offer brief but positive and helpful critiques explaining what makes the cover an excellent one.

Part One: Christian and Independent

I’d like to encourage people to chime in and post the best Independently-published Christian book cover you’ve seen this year. When I say independently-published, I mean not with a big, well-known, famous traditional publisher, but with a small press, or a cover made or purchased or fully-approved for that book by the author him/herself.I am not excluding books where the author purchased a premade cover by saying this. I am excluding books that were made in-house by an employee of a publishing house.

Part Two: Fonts

1. Title Fonts: Are they attractive, contrasting, readable, appropriate for the genre, and well-formed and colored?

2. Subtitle/tagline fonts: Are they compatible with the title, the right size and sort to complement and support the title and genre?

3. Author Fonts: Is the author name readable, strong, but not distracting from the title?

Part Three: Image(s)

Does it use images of good clarity, quality, and that evidence care in the choosing? Are they appropriate to the subject? Are they attention-getting without being simply beautiful or startling or attractive without having any relationship to the book’s title or subject? Are they right for the genre, setting, time period, or otherwise truly “right” for the book?

(Let’s make a separate category for covers with handmade art. Some people just irrationally hate to see anything that looks hand-drawn or colored or painted on a cover, but I think there’s a place for it.)

Part Four: Overall Composition/Design

1. Is the effect clean, organized, and drawing the eyes around to the important elements?

2. Are the colors, shadows, lights, textures pleasing, harmonious, and right for that book? Or, if the purpose is to create suspense, terror, or other emotional responses appropriate to the subject or genre, is it effective in doing that? Do things fit together and seem all to belong in the same composition?

I am hoping many people will participate in this, and make it a celebration of the best in cover design, as well as a learning experience for those who want both to learn to make better covers, and to stop being superior and cruel in our critiques.

Please comment or email us at findleymjmc@gmail.com with covers you’d like to see included. Hopefully by the end of the year we can present a Top 100 Independent Christian Book covers list.

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Guest post by Randy Blackwell: Welcome to the World of Soterion!

Kasey Myles

This is amazing! A novel, and  soon to be an RPG-Based SciFi/Fantasy/Steampunk creation! It would make a stunning addition to the collection of anyone who loves these genres. Please take a look at these amazing images (And these are just tiny samples! You have to see the real stuff!) and then visit with my friend Randy Blackwell on his own site about his novel that will lead to the RPG book:

(Please respect these artists’ creations and do not copy or distribute. They represent copyrighted material.)

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The Alexander Legacy Company One: A Dodge, a Twist, and aTobacconist

A Dodge, a Twist, and a Tobacconist is a Steampunk Literary Tribute The Amazon ebook is now live here:
Sophronia Belle Lyon grew up in the Catskill Mountains of upstate New York and has always loved Sci Fi, Fantasy, and the great literary classics. Please like her facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SophroniaBelleLyon
The book comes out October 30, and should make a great Halloween alternative.
This series melds some better and lesser-known characters of classic literary fiction: A literary dream team of crime fighters including nods to Dickens, Stevenson, Alcott, Austen, Kipling, Doyle, and other writers across the pond, with plenty of homages to great books sprinkled throughout. Prowl the foggy London streets on the track of a ruthless enslaver of souls. Travel the Thames in a Giant Catfish. Soar over London in a stealth glider, and witness true redemptions and restorations no one ever imagined.
Here’s a “deleted scene” that describes some of the characters the story brings together.
A “deleted scene” where Mac Campbell and Rose discuss the biographical studies Phoebe gave them, a copy of which Florizel also received.” ‘Doctor Oliver Twist’? Isn’t that the young man we met with Prince Florizel?”
“Yes,” Mac replied, “the one who might frighten people away.”

“I can’t imagine him frightening anybody. He seemed so sweet and harmless.”
“Perhaps he’s a mad scientist, since he does carry the title of ‘Doctor.’ Orphaned at birth, thrown into the British workhouse system, apprenticed out to a coffin-maker, escaped to London, unwittingly received training as a pickpocket from a fence named Fagin — ”
“How does someone not know he’s being taught to rob people?”
“I don’t get that, either. At any rate, this says Twist was actually the victim of a plot by a half-brother he never met. This lovely sibling knew of Twist’s real family but worked hard to keep him from finding them. The half-brother knew Twist could lay claim to a sizeable inheritance conditional upon Twist keeping an unspotted character. His loving brother Monks paid off the workhouse matron, the parish beadle, the coffin-maker, and a London fence, to try to destroy proofs of the boy’s identity, his reputation and any hope of being re-united with his true family.”
“The poor boy! Did Monks succeed in this terrible plan?”
“Looks as if he would have if it hadn’t been for a prostitute named Nancy. She at first helped kidnap the boy back after he was briefly rescued from the fence. She later repented and went to the man, Brownlow, who had taken Twist in, with evidence that proved not only who Twist really was, but that he hadn’t become a thief as Monks planned. Twist was still eligible to receive his inheritance, and he has put it into scientific research, having built a facility he calls Nancy House.”
“Oh, how terribly sad. Nancy was murdered by the housebreaker Bill Sykes when he discovered how she had exposed the whole operation run by this man Fagin.”
“What an odd history. Still doesn’t explain how he frightens people. We may have to fall back on the mad scientist position. Now, here’s the one I want to read about. Mowgli, native of somewhere in India, Raised by wolves, also called Nathoo, possibly the son of a woman called Messua. Father not identified by name. Forest ranger under a British officer named Gisborne, accompanied by Bagheera, a black leopard of Oodeypore.”
“That is the man who gave you back your stick and watch and sang birdcalls with Phoebe.”
“Did you see how broad his shoulders are? He is all muscle and spring, that fellow. He’s also the one who saved us tonight.”
“I thought so. Then that noise we heard from the other bedroom and the children’s talk of the ‘great black kitty’ — ”
“Bagheera. Well, on with the papers. I believe we may skip over Mrs. Phoebe Moore-Campbell, though it is useful to note that she does not list her ‘talent’ as singing.”
“Yes! It says here she is able to mix freely among all levels of society, both as a celebrity and as a housemaid. Why would Phoebe go back to housemaiding?”
“As Archie said to me, I expect she’ll explain if she has a mind to. Zambo is the next name on the list. Italian nobility, perhaps?”
“Mac, for all the time you spend with your nose in a book, you ought to know better. Zambo is a trade name for a black or mixed-race slave in the Caribbean or South America. This gentleman was freed by a hunter named Lord John Roxton, known as “The flail of the Lord” for his battles against the slave trade. Zambo traveled with the party of this hunter, which included a newspaper reporter and two scientists seeking a place where dinosaurs had been found living in South America.”
“I remember reading the news articles about that! Those idiot scientists had to admit the plateau was real and the dinosaurs were there. But they dismissed the possibility of man and dinosaur living at the same time because they would never acknowledge that God created them within a day of each other. Said some kind of catastrophe millions of years ago upthrust the plateau where the ‘Lost World’ was and kept it ‘primitive,’ complete with ‘missing link’ ape men!'”
“Mac, you’ll wake the children.” Both of them froze as they heard a deep, eerie rumble similar to the sound that had sent Mowgli darting out of the sitting room earlier.
“Or something bigger and less forgiving,” Mac said in a contrite whisper.
“Zambo was unable to go into the lost plateau world with the others because of the actions of some slavers his friend the hunter had thwarted. They had infiltrated the party and were seeking revenge. Zambo dealt with the saboteurs, who thought they had cut off the explorers’ only means of escape from the plateau. He waited faithfully for his companions to return. Roxton found diamonds on the plateau and freely gave a share to his faithful servant. Zambo was therefore was able to devote himself to the work his hunter benefactor started. He now travels in the cause of ending human trafficking all over the world.”
“Next comes a fellow American, someone called S — Er — does that say what I think it does?” Mac squinted and adjusted his thick, gold-rimmed glasses.
“Slue-Foot Sue? Um… perhaps she is a real cowgirl, Mac. I would like to meet one.”
“This says she is the wife of a western folk hero named Pecos Bill. She and her husband were prospectors, ranchers and Texas Rangers, as well as working for the Pinkerton Detective Agency.”
“Mrs.– err — Sue is known for her exemplary riding, tracking and mechanical skills.”
“I am certain Phoebe’s crimefighters need a good cowgirl-mechanic. I just keep telling myself, ‘Phoebe will explain.’ Hey, Rosie, here’s Fun See!”
“Oh. Mac, that’s not his real name, you know.”
“I know that’s not his real name. But he always let us call him that, and it got to be a habit. Never could get my tongue around the genuine article. Anyway, it says he’s an expert on all things trade and commerce, especially as it relates to Chinese and other Asian ships. That makes sense.”
“Dear old Fun See. I still cannot believe he and Annabel Bliss are married, and how happy they are.”
“Annabel has changed a lot. Of course, so has Fun. You remember how you liked him better than his uncle at first because he was still ‘all Chinese?’ It’s amazing how well he’s kept that image, in spite of being so savvy about everything. He’s mastered a dozen languages, and Miss Annabel now resembles a China doll instead of — what was it you said about that other stuck-up thing they sent to entertain you before we boys came to your rescue?”
“Oh, you mean Ariadne Blish! I said she looked so much like a wax doll I wanted to pinch her and see if she would squeak! Annabelle was never that unbearable.”
“The two of them dress and act the perfect dynasty couple but they don’t miss a thing that goes on about them. Fun’s done a load of customs work, and knows everything about every ship that sails in and out of China and the whole British Empire. Annabelle helps him every step of the way.”
“Here is an Edward Ferrars. English. Son of a gentleman’s family, disinherited by his mother for wanting to marry beneath himself, got a living – that’s like a pastorate, I guess — a small church in the English countryside.”
“Married a Miss Elinor Dashwood. Apparently she was not the aforementioned lady beneath himself, although, on the other hand, there does not seem to have been any great fortune involved. I’m so glad I picked a rich wife.”
Rose made a face and threw her little scented pillow, a gift from Uncle Alec, which she still kept and carried everywhere with her. “How does this quiet couple fit in with these people?”
“It says here that he is very involved in and knowledgeable about church, government, and the education system. I’m not sure how that fits in with Phoebe’s mission, but I have no doubt that will be made clear to us tomorrow. And now, Madam Campbell, since the foundation representatives must hear this proposal at such an early hour tomorrow – ” he glanced at the watch on the bedside table and grimaced ” — or should I say today, I suggest we retire.”
“Not just yet.” Rose put her arms around her husband’s neck and gave him a kiss.
“Oh, well, if you insist.”

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A Terrifying Alternative to Science

Nightmare at Emerald High: A Christian Thriller

Malcolm Drake has so much to bear as a sixteen year old high school student. His mother left for another man, taking all their savings. His father has worked long hours playing financial catch-up and been too weary to see his son grow up. Bullies force him to find a hiding place deep in the school’s basement to eat and study. Still, he’s managed to stay out of trouble and keep his grades high.

Malcolm has deeper issues in his past, however, that won’t leave him alone. Haunting dreams of relentless chases through the darkness leave him exhausted in the mornings. A visiting minister called out a prophecy about Malcolm when Malcolm didn’t even know God. Besides, he fled the church because his mother became involved with a deacon and choir director. Malcolm’s father also abandoned the scene of his heartbreak and humiliation. Church keeps pulling Malcolm back, though, and people are praying for him and his father even after ten years’ absence.

A chance for a scholarship pulls Malcolm into an elite science class. He feels strangely drawn to tell the youth pastor about this opportunity since his father is seldom home. Transcendental Meditation is one of the lighter items on the strange “science class” menu. Is it just ancient wisdom applied to solve today’s problems? Or did a chance scene of violent intimidation witnessed from Malcolm’s hiding place give him a hint about the real agenda of the scholarship committee?

This story gives one teenager a lot to deal with. But Malcolm’s not alone as he comes to grips with deciding what he has to do about all the pressure and danger in his life. He has a protection he doesn’t even know about. Because even when you think you’ve left God behind, you might just find that God’s people, and God Himself, still have your back.

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Put a Little Adult Historical Romantic Suspense on Your EReader


Our books don’t quite pigeonhole easily into one genre, so we try to give them descriptions like the one above. The three books featured today are Send a White Rose, The Baron of Larcondale, and Vienta. In the spirit of romance, we include here some excerpts from these three books on the subject of true love. Most people think love is impossible to define but the Scriptures have many examples of people who exemplify true love and serve as examples to fiction writers. Adam called his wife Eve “bone of my bone, and flesh of my flesh.” She was a helper suitable for him.

Isaac’s wife was also picked out and brought to him. He had never seen Rebecca before, yet it was love at first sight when they met. Jacob served, in spite of the deception practiced on him, to get his Rachel, and even learned to respect and seek counsel from Leah and his other wives. Solomon wrote of the ultimate love story with his Shulamite, his snapshots full of scents and sounds and images of intimacy within marriage.

From Send a White Rose comes New Mexico Federal Judge Bartholomew Durant’s musings on what a wife should be.

“You’ve always been so unselfish, only wanting to draw me closer to the Lord and see me become more like Him.”

“Judge, I—”

“Let me finish. I have been so blind all these years that I couldn’t see what I needed most. You know I was thinking of choosing a wife before all this happened. After it came I thought I couldn’t burden anyone with caring for me. Now I can do most things for myself, or, at least, Asa thinks I’ll learn to soon. It’s still a lot to ask of someone to take a cripple like myself, but I can’t help but see that I need a woman to be with me, help me, be my guide and friend and lover.”

……………………………………………………………

“I have sent you this rose in the hope that you will remember another, sent as an urgent summons to save my physical life. This one I send in the hope of completing my life. My spirit, my soul, my whole being are incomplete, and I believe you alone can complete them. I have learned a little about being patient, but I hope I have been patient long enough.”

…………………………………………………………..

“I have grown up among a lot of men, and though my mother tried to make a gentleman of me I fear I have forgotten too much of her teaching. I was hoping I could rely on your help to mend my manners, and in general. I think that’s what a wife is for, to be a help where a man most needs help.”

The Baron of Larcondale is set in two neighboring fictional countries, but it still fits the pattern of a historical novel. Tristan of Parangor finds a most unexpected kind of love in the neighboring country of Tarraskida, and is a little reluctant to embrace it, and his future wife.

“Mayra, I would have worked and saved to pay for your freedom, and I would have made you my wife,” Tristan cried, “but now I can’t –”

“You would’ve wed me before you learned what I was,” Mayra said in a flat voice, her dress rustling and her voice retreating upward. “But now you understand that it’s impossible.”

“No, no, you misunderstand! Mayra, What your mistress forced you to do doesn’t matter to me. But I can’t force you to marry me knowing that I will always be helpless and useless and –”

“Oh, my prince, such a thing could never be!” Mayra laughed out loud, startling Tristan and confusing him utterly. ” … She had knelt before him again, and taken his hand in hers, twirling the ring on his finger as she had done that other time.

“I –I did –” Tristan faltered, feeling the softness of her fingers, the warmth of her touch, smelling her fragrance, and seeing in an instant her beautiful face before his mind’s eye, clear and luminous in the overwhelming darkness.

Mayra’s hand touched the hollow of his throat, pushed his hair aside, smoothed her fingers over his shoulder.

“You and I together, we will see, my prince,” Mayra said in a low, earnest voice. “I didn’t dare to speak until I knew you loved me – ”

“I’ve always loved you, Mayra,” Tristan groaned. “That’s why I didn’t want to –”

“Shh,” Mayra whispered. She put her hand on his lips. “Master Thomas,” she called. Tristan heard someone come into the room. “My prince is ready to make me his princess, now. I’ve helped him see, just as I promised. Just as I always will.”

Vienta is set in Texas between the time of the battles at the Alamo and at Monterrey. Hamilton Jessup enters into an empty marriage contract but before long finds himself not only falling in love with his sham wife, but daring to hope she has done the same.

“My boy, there is nothing more important than the right woman,” Ham said fervently. “God made Eve for Adam. Abraham’s Sarah was still turning the heads of kings at ninety. Rebecca just hopped off a camel and Isaac loved her. Solomon’s wives turned his heart from the Lord and brought down the wisest king the world ever had. The right woman can give you something to do your job for. The wrong one can destroy you. Women are so powerful. Women are so wonderful. Sure, they’re dangerous, but only if they’re bad ones. It’s up to you to keep your eyes on the prize – the job to be done and the woman just past the end of it who is your very great reward. I’m not saying your woman is Angelita. I just don’t want you to be so sure you don’t need one.”

……………………………………………………………

“Mrs. Jessup,” Ham said finally, finding that the words stuck in his throat and he felt most unworthy to say them, “I was wondering if we could talk about something. I was telling Zachary I’m keeping my eyes on the prize but the truth is I don’t know if there really is one for me. You being the prize I mean. You’ve said you only have eyes for me but that sounded like a joke. I want you to understand this is the one thing I don’t want to joke about. I love you. I want to marry you, especially now that you’re a believer.”

……………………………………………………………

“I don’t know much about astronomy, but I hear there are supposed to be twin stars that always keep together in the same orbit. Maybe we can be content to be like that, always remembering how we’re not worthy of that other bright star sailing over there through Heaven, but knowing God made us to go on together. Think we can do that?”

Maeve sprang out of her chair and threw herself into Ham’s arms. He embraced her also, breathed her in, kissed her, and then set her carefully back down in the chair.

“There, now,” he said with a sigh. “Zachary was right. Sometimes a woman can keep you from thinking about the job.”

Let God show you a little true love this Christmas with one, two, or even all three, of these non-formula romances.

Here’s another author’s book and trailer links:

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Evaluation of Complete Homeschool Curricula, Part One

Check out the Homeschool Reviews website. They have information and opinions on many more curricula than we cover here.

http://www.homeschoolreviews.com/

Bob Jones University Press

Bob Jones is a private, non-denominational, independent, fundamental University and also has a K-12 education system. They use the King James Bible as a standard for consistency but do not hold to the King James Only philosophy. The Press has been producing curriculum for decades, drawing writers from the Elementary, Academy and University faculty. All the curriculum is written by experienced teachers in the appropriate field and test-taught in the Elementary School or Academy. They also have many novels and nonfiction books, including a few titles available on Kindle, any of which can be used as supplementary reading material.

You can buy individual student copy books on any subject, all the way up to a complete years’ curriculum, videos of teachers teaching, assessments in the online version, and quite a bit of flexibility for students who are at different grade levels in different subjects within a complete year’s program. The complete curriculum comes in online, hard disc, and CD versions, basically the same material, but apparently assessments are only available in the online version. You must have a high speed internet connection to use the online version. This is the highest quality and the best material available. Mary worked at BJU Press as an editor. The content is distinctively biblical, not just surface Christian or morally positive, and it is kept updated. Skilled graphic artists and painters have created colorful, interesting layouts and illustrated content. Instead of completely leaving out secular worldviews or tacking on moral and Christian applications, the curriculum teaches how to judge what is true and false, good and evil, to strengthen convictions and give ammunition to fight the enemy. It is also one of the most expensive, costing over $900 per course. If you can afford it, this is the way to go. If you have three elementary age children, the complete curriculum plus musical instruction will be more than $3000 per year. High school will be more.

Several people have complained that there is too much detail, or that it includes too much material, and does not provide the highly structured lesson plans some curricula do. This is because it gives parents/teachers the option of eliminating material they choose not to cover. One complaint by people is that it is “college level” or “too difficult.” This is designed for a thorough education in a complete Christian worldview, not just basic, get-by schooling. It does require some knowledge on the parent’s part to make choices and plan what to teach and when.

History combines Biographies of Christians and Christian perspectives on historical events, Culture Studies and Geography, with timelines, in Elementary and secondary levels.

The Math program is a unit approach, not an incremental approach like Saxon, but it does use more review than a traditional unit approach. Problem solving and critical thinking skills are included. Teachers are encouraged to emphasize this aspect.

Science Is divided into Physical Science, Life Science, Earth Science, Biology, Physics and Chemistry. They are high quality, well-prepared, and regularly updated.

Sonlight

Sonlight’s founders follow the Reformed Church. They say their curriculum is literature-rich, meaning they sell you colorful readers, fiction for various ages, many award-winning books and controlled-vocabulary readers, and provide instructor’s guidebooks which have comprehension questions. Their philosophy is the “look for teachable moments” school and they do not have written tests or answer keys in their program. A complete curriculum for a year can cost over $1000 dollars. It is one of the most expensive programs out there.

They use outside sources for Science and Math, Saxon, Singapore, Apologia (see review below). Saxon is a good program and we recommend it. Singapore seems to be similar in using the Incremental approach. Neither of these are Christian, but Sonlight has teachers’ guides that may include that. Apologia seems to be  a Christian, education and Missions-minded organization, but they don’t say what they believe on their website. Nothing at all about it. And it should be noted that when companies offer curriculum they have not written they should at least be well-versed in the subject areas to be able to understand how the curriculum works. There is a section on Sonlight’s website stating that they have tried all the Science experiments and modified teachers’ guides to explain any misleading statements or unexpected outcomes. This is not the same as knowing Science and understanding the material  in the texts.

Many homeschooling parents said at first they tried to follow the program completely, but began to pick and choose parts, dropped back a level in some areas, or got reading books from the library instead of buying from Sonlight.  Most said they wanted to get the written catalog to know what books were needed so they could find them from other sources instead of paying for new/full price copies from Sonlight.

Calvert Schools

Calvert has K-8 curriculum only. It has both a physical school in Baltimore, MD, and other schools throughout the country which use their materials. Homeschoolers can teach the materials themselves, buying individual subjects. Calvert promotes a complete grade level package, however. Calvert allows all parents to call or contact them online to ask questions and get specific help.

This level starts at about $850 per year and varies somewhat according to grade level for the complete curriculum. Individual courses are $30 to $40. A second level with an advisory teacher assigned to you includes phone, online chat, and email communication with a Calvert teacher and periodic tests they grade, plus the teacher’s reports of the student’s progress and suggestions if improvement is needed. This level also provides transcripts on request. They also have two levels of instruction, a faster pace covering more material and a slower pace covering less material. (this second option is not available in the complete online school). Books and teacher guides must be returned at the end of the year.

Calvert advertises itself as being non-sectarian and provide no Bible curriculum. Homeschooling parents say it is very secular, presents some evolutionary concepts, “even in math,” and while it provides very complete structure, lesson planning, and makes the task easier for a very busy parent situation (one person who commented was working, going to school, and teaching her child), some insisted on a more Christian emphasis in History and Science. Complete grade programs range from $850 to $1250 for the “Classic” and “Classic” with an advisory teacher and periodic graded tests. They also sell “enrichment” and “school spirit” materials. The full online course was new in 2010, included videos and online communication and forum access, grading and progress assessment, plus optional “clubs” for photography, Science and gifted. Prices for this version exceed $2500 per year, varying by grade level.

Covenant Home Curriculum

This was developed by a Presbyterian Minister. He states that it follows Reformed Theology and that it is based on Classic literature and traditional Classical Education. He specifically states that he limits the use of Classical Literature (Greek) because of its ungodly worldview. The curriculum includes English Grammar and Composition materials which they have created and correlated with Classic literature selections. The publisher states that his materials guide users toward godly, Christian worldviews. He gives multiple choices of texts that can be used for Bible, Science and Math courses. Most curricula do not. Among his recommendations are Saxon for Math and Bob Jones University Press for Science. He also includes Latin for language study. Users say it is very structured. Most users liked the structure, goals, and Christian emphasis. One user said a learning-disabled student who began using it three years before graduation and was able to overcome serious reading and math deficiencies to the point of being accepted for college. Many people appreciated the “patient and thorough” telephone, message board and e-mail support CHC gives to its customers. Prices vary greatly, anywhere from $550 and up for lower grades to $850 for upper grades. These could be higher depending on your choices for textbooks.

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